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Crimson Clover

Crimson Clover

 

Crimson clovers spring growth can rapidly produce a large amount of biomass. Crimson can grow at lower temperatures better then almost any other clover species. Maturing earlier in the spring than hairy vetch allows this species to reach its maximum N production sooner.

Peak N production occurs during flowering around the middle of May when it is induced by 12 hours of daylight. This species grows great in mixes and fits well into a traditional corn/soybean rotation.

Even if the clover is winter killed, it still can produce a thick mulch that reduces erosion, increases infiltration and has been shown to inhibit small seeded weed species from germinating. If desired, crimson clover can be utilized in a rotation that would allow it to reseed the field. The deep, red blossoms are 2.5 cm in length and are renowned for their beauty and nectar production. The flowers attract many pollinators and some very beneficial insects, such as pirate bugs and lady bugs.